Woman is burned while rescuing her dog from Yellowstone hot spring

A woman from Washington state suffered burns from her shoulders to her feet when she tried to rescue her dog from a Yellowstone National Park hot spring.Park rangers and firefighters cared for the 20-year-old woman before she was taken to the burn unit at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls, park officials said in a statement Tuesday.The woman’s name, intensity of her burns and condition weren’t released after she was burned Monday afternoon in the Madison Junction area.

INTERESTING FACT ABOUT YOUR PET: Pets are a major source of support and increase the ability to cope, which contributes to keeping cholesterol and blood pressure down.

The woman and her father had stopped to look around when their dog jumped out of their car and into Maiden’s Grave Spring near the Firehole River. After the woman tried rescuing the dog, her father pulled her out of the spring and drove her to West Yellowstone, Montana.

Somebody rescued the dog and the father said he planned to take it to a veterinarian, park officials said.

On a hot summer day, fill up an inflatable pool with water and ice.

She was the second woman burned in a Yellowstone thermal feature in recent weeks.

A park concessions employee suffered second- and third-degree burns to 5% of her body near Old Faithful Geyser in September, park officials said.

Yellowstone has more than 10,000 thermal features, which can be as hot as 280 degrees Fahrenheit.

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Give him the exercise he needs. All pets need regular exercise to stay fit and to release their energy. Without it, your pet will begin to act out. Young pets that do not get enough exercise are more likely to develop negative behavioral issues that lead many to give up their pet.

Oct. 7, 202100:23