Woman is burned while rescuing her dog from Yellowstone hot spring

A woman from Washington state suffered burns from her shoulders to her feet when she tried to rescue her dog from a Yellowstone National Park hot spring.Park rangers and firefighters cared for the 20-year-old woman before she was taken to the burn unit at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Center in Idaho Falls, park officials said in a statement Tuesday.The woman’s name, intensity of her burns and condition weren’t released after she was burned Monday afternoon in the Madison Junction area.

A Wagging Tail Does Not Always Equal a Happy Dog. Don’t approach a strange dog just because it’s wagging it’s tail. Tail wagging isn’t always the universal sign of happiness – it can also indicate fear or insecurity. Be sure to teach your children about the basics of dog bite prevention.

The woman and her father had stopped to look around when their dog jumped out of their car and into Maiden’s Grave Spring near the Firehole River. After the woman tried rescuing the dog, her father pulled her out of the spring and drove her to West Yellowstone, Montana.

Somebody rescued the dog and the father said he planned to take it to a veterinarian, park officials said.

Be realistic. Unrealistic goals will only prevent you from growing. There are two common mistakes a dog owner can make that will slam the brakes hard on any potential progress you might be hoping for. First, the expectations we place on our dogs and ourselves. The misguided belief that your dog “should” be performing or responding at a certain predetermined level. Another mistake many owners make is having unrealistic assumptions. Many of us assume that our dog understands what we want and that he knows what we’re asking of him. As if that wasn’t bad enough, some of us assume that the dogs failure to perform means he’s either rebelling, stubborn, or just plain stupid.

She was the second woman burned in a Yellowstone thermal feature in recent weeks.

A park concessions employee suffered second- and third-degree burns to 5% of her body near Old Faithful Geyser in September, park officials said.

Yellowstone has more than 10,000 thermal features, which can be as hot as 280 degrees Fahrenheit.

2 firefighters hurt in smoke explosion caught on camera

A Wagging Tail Does Not Always Equal a Happy Dog. Don’t approach a strange dog just because it’s wagging it’s tail. Tail wagging isn’t always the universal sign of happiness – it can also indicate fear or insecurity. Be sure to teach your children about the basics of dog bite prevention.

Oct. 7, 202100:23