Reagandoodle and his little buddy share update on their growing family

Three years ago, the heartwarming friendship between a little boy and his foster grandmother’s dog captured the hearts of people everywhere.

“As soon as they met, there was an instant bond and just you could see the love between the two of them,” Sandi Swiridoff told NBC News.To spread the joy, Swiridoff, who lives in Oregon, began documenting the antics of her Australian labradoodle, Reagan, and his "little buddy" (real name: Sawyer). People couldn't get enough. Today, the @Reagandoodle Instagram account boasts more than 521,000 devoted followers — and two ridiculously cute new subjects.

An update on Buddy and Reagan, the viral foster child and his beloved canine friend

Swiridoff's daughter and son-in-law, Kari and Zach Lewis, adopted Sawyer in Dec. 2018 and later his foster sister, Stella, in May. There's also a new dog in the picture — Swirdoff’s son, Justin, has taken in a doodle named Lincoln.

The foursome are now notorious for wearing matching costumes and pajama sets. As Swiridoff explains on the Reagandoodle website, "Twinning is our thang."Just like her brother, Stella follows Reagan everywhere and she loves giving him kisses on the nose.

Breathe easy. In addition to sweating through their paw pads, dogs pant to cool themselves off. A panting dog can take 300-400 breaths (compared to his regular 30-40) with very little effort.

“Dogs are unconditionally loving ... no matter what you come from, no matter what trauma you’ve been through,” Kari Lewis said. “There’s something really special about having a companion that just loves you and sees you and wants you exactly as you are.”

Swiridoff has published three children’s books inspired by Reagan and her grandchildren, and her annual calendar has raised more than $60,000 to help children in foster care.

“I would have never thought that an Instagram account for a dog could turn into something so big and so helpful to other people,” Swiridoff told NBC News. “It’s great.”

Therapy dogs give young St. Jude patients a reason to smile