Let these adorable ticklish pets soothe your lockdown woes

pictures of pets getting tickled
So pure, so good (Pictures: Splitpics UK)

People have been sharing pictures of their pets being tickled and honestly, it is exactly what our lockdown needed.

There’s a lot of very serious things happening in the world right now, what with the pandemic and all, so it’s unfortunately even easier than ever these days to lose ourselves in doom and gloom.

Dr Sandro Galea from Boston University previously spoke to us about the impact coronavirus and the resulting lockdown may have on our mental health , saying: ‘While these steps may be critical to mitigate the spread of this disease, they will undoubtedly have consequences for mental health and wellbeing in both the short and long term.’

Therefore it’s especially important to take some time for happy and silly things when and where you can, which is where these ticklish pets come in.

From dogs and cats to turtles to lambs, animal-owners have been sharing photos of their pets being tickled – and honestly it’s almost too pure for us to take.

So whether you have a pet to share your lockdown with or you need a bit of vicarious joy, give your brain a bath with these exceedingly cute pictures.

a dog getting its belly tickled
Look at this silly baby (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
Someone’s having a great time (Picture: Splitpics UK)

Focus on the Human-Animal Bond. “Dogs and cats have broken down the walls of our hearts. There haven’t been comparable domesticated species in 5,000 years.” For Dr. Becker, it’s clear that pets and people have evolved to benefit each other. He explains, “When you’re petting them, you both get this massive release of oxytocin, prolactin, dopamine, and a decrease in cortisol. It’s a reciprocal biochemical spa treatment.” As they age, it can be easy to take pets for granted. Make time for a little human-animal bonding every day.

a piglet getting its belly tickled
It’s not just dogs and cats who enjoy attention (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
Our faces when we look at these photos (Picture: Splitpics UK)

A study last year found that stroking a cat or a dog for just 10 minutes can lower stress.

Researchers from Washington State University found that there were sizable reductions in the stress hormone cortisol after a mere 10 minutes of petting,
a dog getting its belly tickled
Nothing but good vibes (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a cat getting its armpit tickled
Toe beans! (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a fox getting its belly tickled
So tiny, so good (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a lamb getting its belly tickled
A smizing master class(Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
(Picture: Splitpics UK)
Patricia Pendry, an associate professor in the Department of Human Development at WSU said: ‘Students in our study that interacted with cats and dogs had a significant reduction in cortisol, a major stress hormone. ‘

‘Just 10 minutes can have a significant impact.’

a turtle getting its belly tickled
Sometimes props help with the tickling (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
Serving tickle looks (Picture: Splitpics UK)

So if you’ve got a pet of your own, why not get involved and get tickling?

a dog getting its belly tickled
Oh, to be this relaxed (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a cat laying on its back
This is a belly begging for a little rub (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
That’s a happy face, right? (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
Jaw-droppingly good tickling (Picture: Splitpics UK)
Dr Vishal Shah, GP and Medical Director at Thriva, previously told us: ‘Repeatedly hearing about the pandemic can cause feelings of anxiety and fear, so avoid checking the news constantly and stick to reliable news outlets.’

Learn to read your dogs body language. Since no dog I know of is able to mosey up to the kitchen table, pour himself a cup of coffee, and confess to all of the things that annoy, frighten, and stress him out, I suggest that the next best thing is to learn to read your dog’s many signals and body language. This is how your dog will communicate with you.

So do yourself a favour and keep scrolling.

a cat getting its belly tickled
Jealous of these relaxation levels (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a cat getting its belly tickled
Who doesn’t love a little wee hug? (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
Drifting off (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
Ever get a belly rub this good? (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a hedgehog getting its belly tickled
Hedgehogs need attention too (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
So fluffy! (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a piglet getting its belly tickled
Ultimate chill (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
This one’s doesn’t look too sure, but we’re sure they’ll come around (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog lying on its back
‘Come on, rub this belly’ (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
When you need your tummy tickled, but ball is life (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a cat getting its belly tickled
A bridge pose that even the most advanced yoga teacher would be jealous of (Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
(Picture: Splitpics UK)
a dog getting its belly tickled
Us after reading seeing all these cute pics (Picture: Splitpics UK)
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