Heartbroken cat caught on camera 'crying' when his owner leaves him home alone - video

FU FU the cat has gone viral after his owner released footage of him appearing to cry as his name was called out through the home monitor.

China: Pet cat appears tearful in security camera footage

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The pet cat in China is now famous after seemingly shedding tears into a security camera while being left home alone. Fu Fu, the two-year-old British shorthair, could not control his emotions when he heard his owner calling his name through the monitor.
His owner, Ms Meng, said she was checking on the cat via a security camera app on her phone.The emotional moggy was filmed on February 8 in Xuzhou, eastern China. Ms Meng had gone to her parents’ house in a nearby town to celebrate the Lunar New Year.Ms Meng said that she couldn’t take Fu Fu to her parents’ house because he is shy and clingy. She said that her cat loves spending time with her.When she departed for her trip, Ms Meng left enough food and water for Fu Fu and watched the CCTV surveillance regularly.

Many dogs have a condition nicknamed “Frito Feet,” in which their feet smell little bit like corn chips. As Matt Soniak wrote in a Big Question on this site, this has to do with the kind of bacteria found on a pup’s feet, and “could be due to yeast or Proteus bacteria. Both are known for their sweet, corn tortilla–like smell. Or it could be Pseudomonas bacteria, which smell a little fruitier—but pretty close to popcorn to most noses.”

READ MOREDog found hundreds of miles from home after being stolen twice

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Cat caught on camera crying when his owner left him home alone (Image: Douyin)

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The video was uploaded to Douyin, the Chinese version of TikTok. (Image: Douyin)

The adorable video shows Fu Fu purring with tears in his eyes whilst Ms Meng calls his name. She can be heard saying “do you miss me? I will come back in a few days.”

Fu Fu turns to look at the door, hoping to see her, and then touches the camera with his paw.

Ms Meng said: “I felt heartbroken when I saw this. I had planned to stay at my parents’ home for a week, but we all returned to Xuzhou early.”

Four days later, Ms Meng released a video update on Douyin which shows Fu Fu excitedly running towards her, so happy that she was finally home.

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Ms Meng released a video update on Douyin which shows Fu Fu excitedly running towards her. (Image: Douyin)

Teary eyes in cats can be a sign of illness, such as eye infections or blocked tear ducts.

Although, Ms Meng says that Fu Fu is perfectly healthy and sometimes has tears in his eyes when he is anxious or hungry.

Scientists have discovered that cats do suffer hurt feelings when they are left alone for long periods of time. The Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences and Uppsala University concluded that, much like dogs, cats also suffer from forms of separation anxiety.DON'T MISSChris Eubank’s call for independent London as Brexit row split UK [CELEB]Prince Philip 'strode off' after encounter with Vanessa [TV]Escape to the Chateau's Dick warned to 'stop' sharing intimate details [TV]

Keep Them Active. Energy varies between breeds, says Dr. Becker. “Greyhounds, Labs, Golden Retrievers, Jack Russell Terriers, Border Collies, and other active breeds have unfathomable energy.” He continues, “wolves spend 80% of their time awake, moving. With cats, there’s not such an exercise requirement,” but providing outlets for play at home is still crucial. For both cats and dogs he recommends food-dispensing that “recreates the hunt,” and puzzle feeders that engage your pet’s “body and mind.”

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Fu Fu loves spending time with his owner. (Image: Ms Meng/MailOnline)

The researchers monitored 24 pets, aged between six months and 15 years, with video cameras in their homes. They discovered that cats interact more intensely, purring and stretching for longer, when owners returned after a long separation. They said that this could reflect a greater need to re-establish the relationship between cat and owner.

Vets advise owners to help their pets survive periods of separation by leaving on the television and radio as well as providing them with lots of toys.